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20110701
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
pakistan didn't do enough, if much avenue anything to help find usama bin laden and maybe even protected him and this morning relations between that key u.s. ally and partner in the fight against terror, is standing on even shakier ground. a report this morning in the "new york times" says the u.s. could suspend a big chunk of military aid to pakistan. and it is a lot of our money, $800 million, in security assistance. peter doocy live in washington with the details. are we looking to cut off the military of pakistan completely? >> reporter: no, but, as you said, "new york times" is reporting that we might cut $800 million out of the 2-plus billion we give pakistan in security assistance and that is because the administration does not apparently think they are being helpful in catching militant and, probably because pakistan kicked 100 of our army trainers out of the country the last few weeks and it comes very very, shortly after the strain on the u.s. relationship which was exposed following our raid on their soil to kill bin laden and earlier this week the new secretary of defense, pa
in cashmere. prosecutors charge that two alleged agents for pakistan punled millions of dollars as part of the plan. the complaint alleges the pair fault fied and concealed information from the u.s. government. they face up to five years in prison if convicted. pakistan and india have disputed the status of kashmir for decades. >>> israel has stopped another ship trying to break its blockade of gaza. the navy seized the ship, part of a larger flotilla leaving from greece. israel says any supplies onboard will be transferred legally to gaza. israel insists on controlling access to gaza because it says otherwise smugglers will try to ship weapons to militants. and a colorado air controller had a blood alcohol level exceeding the allowed limit. he reportedly works at a center that handles air traffic for several states. a family member said he was given the choice of resigning or entering rehab. no charges have been filed in that case. and 764 lucky couples get to tie the knot sunday in new york city. but first, they'll have to win a lottery that closes thursday. sunday is the first day fo
. pakistan? where would you focus your attention? >> pakistan's an important challenge. there's not much we can do about it. we've tried all sorts of things there and nothing seems to work. i would say revitalizing our relationships in asia and the pacific. that's where history the going to be written in the 21st surgeriry. i would say involved there. better relations with ind ka ya with the countries of southeast asia. doing something about our energy situation that we're less vulnerable on vagaries of price and supply that would go a long way. again, i'd focus more at home on competitiveness, on improving our immigration policy. on the quality of our schools. on the quality of our transportation infrastructure and so forth. again, we have got to retore the foundations of american power. that's a prerequisite if we're going to lead in the world either by what we do or our example. >> restoration is the theme. i hope it's the subject of the next book. thanks so much for joining us. >> thanks, andrea. >> it's very provocative richard. >>> a word of warning the images you're about to see is h
was on pakistan's safe havens there. that where many in washington believe al qaeda was hiding. big concerns they naif found a breathing space in afghanistan. >> if they have a breathing space in afghanistan, we are nearing a decade mark in this conflict. can you push al qaeda out of afghanistan permanently, and the subquestion in that scenario has been when will the afghans be ready to do this themselves? when will they take the lead in the army and police? where are we there? >> reporter: very difficult to answer that. the immediate reaction is the afghans are nowhere near ready. the bulk of the army, the guys we saw in that piece, that report back there, only 5 out of 15 willing to go on patrol one morning. many patrols turned back because the afghans weren't ready to go down. concerns there certainly if they are trying to hunt down the remnants of al qaeda or perhaps returning al qaeda elements within pakistan, those are afghan army soldiers we came across on the job. frankly, also the american presence isn't strong or sophisticated or maybe well equipped enough to go after those element
headlines later today. 11:00 eastern former pakistan president pervez musharraf gives a speech. >>> at noon the crew of space shuttle "atlantis" will hold a news conference to talk about their final mission. "atlantis" landed at kennedy space center around 6:00 this morning ending the 30-year program. >>> house republicans are call ing to push the cut cap balance bill. a news conference at 12:45 eastern. >>> let's go ahead and check in first with kate bolduan in washington. kate? >> lawmakers and the white house are all watching the clock, still looking for a way out of this debt ceiling crisis we find ourselves in still today. how will they break the log jam in or at the top of the hour. >>> also coming up in the next hour, a minnesota community divided by a school district's curriculum policy on sexual orientation. now a federal investigation and also the threat of a lawsuit that is pending by two civil rights groups. we're going to have that full story coming up in the next hour. >>> and i'm david mattingly in atlanta. will the nfl sign a labor agreement? there is a lot of hope going aro
. >> the job is most certainly not done. al qaeda operatives still plan across the border in pakistan. the taliban still try to regain lost ground. still intimidate and still assassinate. >> these attacks on karzai's inner circle are, we're told, likely to get worse as u.s. troops again coming home and through the transition in 2014, shepard. >> shepard: jennifer, thank you. there is word of enough signs two al qaeda groups may be joining forces. u.s. officials are now saying the branch in yemen has given weapons, fighters, beings explosives and training to the affiliate in somalia. yes, ma'am mental and somalia coming together against us. the officials say this is especially dangerous because both groups have recruited u.s. citizens. remember that radical american cleric anwar al awlaki is the leader of al qaeda in yemen. the feds have linked him to recent terror plots against the united states. including the attempted christmas day underwear bombing, the food massacre and botched times square bombing. catherine herridge works intelligence for us live from d.c. tonight. catherine, de
at the indian subcontinent, the population is 1.4 billion, same as china, which includes bangladesh and pakistan of it. it's a lot of people in a small area, but they're running out of water, particularly in india. they're overpumping their aquefers, their wells are running dry. and they're projected to grow by 1 million people in the years ahead. subsaharan africa has morelan l, but its population is growing very fast, and it doesn't have the resources to develop the productivity of the land fully. so that's the problem there. and the hunger and malnutrition in the world is concentrated in the indian subcontinent and subsaharan africa. >> do you think the rest of the world -- there's been a big call from the u.n. to say, we need to help these people. is there help available in the rest of the world with the economy teetering the way it is? a lot of countries saying we'd like to help. but we just can't. >> if it's just the horn of africa, 10 million people, 12 million people, that's large. if it becomes bigger and affects a number of countries, then it would be scramble time. the question is how
afghanistan, pakistan. you're reading a couple pieces in the "new york times." now it's spreading to all of these different countries and one that really jumped off the page for me, drone attacks in somalia. >> joining us, jeremy scahill, on the cia secret sites in somalia, jeremy, the secret training programs and secret prisons out of somalia is part of your reporting there. how big a threat are these terrorist group there's? >> we should say first of all president obama campaigned on a promise to go up against these bush era policies declaring war on the world, running secret sites, torturing prisoners. deeply involved in an underground dungeon officially run by the somali national security agency, but their salaries are paid by the cia directly. in fact, one somali agent described thousand hairli ed ho and paid by u.s. agents and the u.s. is interrogating prisoners, including those rendered by the kenyan government, snatched off the streets in nairobi based on u.s. intelligence and taken to this secret prison and interrogated. it goes against the president's ordered he signed in janua
and talked about, we're not worried about the al qaeda in pakistan because of the death of bin laden though we can't write off ayman al-zawahiri, the new leader of al qaeda in the pakistani tribal areas but he's worried about yemen and al qaeda in the arabian peninsula and also, somalia, across the waterways there where you have al-shabab. so, al qaeda has been morphing for quite some time, since 9/11 and i think he's saying the threats are moving in that direction and that he thinks and the administration believes that al qaeda, the one we think of from 9/11 purposes, usama bin laden and ayman al-zawahiri, may be on its death bed. alisyn: and how, in this new 2.0 version, how much of a threat is anwar al-awlaki. >> he's dangerous, he was here in the u.s. on 9/11 and left the u.s. and went to yemen and, is responsible probably for at least three major attacks or plots in the u.s., including the detroit under wear bombing. including the fort hood assaults, attacks and the ink cartridge capers, where they tried to modify ink printer cartridges as bombs and is considered probably the most dang
. neither al qaeda in afghanistan nor pakistan now pose as grave a threat to america as their affiliate in somalia, that according to u.s. counterterrorism officials. the group known as al shabaab has even been successful in recruiting westerners. >> al shabaab is recruiting inside american mosques in somali communities like minneapolis and san diego according to the justice department. >> reporter: congressman peter king, chairman of the commtee on homeland security, held a hearing on the increasing threat. >> the terrorist training camps run by al shabaab teach their participants how to kill people and so the ability of one of those individuals to return to the united states and to put into practice that training is a threat. >> reporter: abc news has learned that before he died osama bin laden was secretly urging al shabaab to target the u.s. at least 40 somali-americans have trained and fought in a civil war in their homeland in the last three years, including three suicide bombers. as many as two dozen remain unaccounted for. >> probably the next, most significant terrorist threat
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)